Revd Eileen Harrop outside St Anne's Church in Bishop Auckland Market Place (Picture: Keith Blundy)

from UKME Advisor Rev’d Eileen Harrop

Friends, we thank God for the life of our brother George Floyd whose death heightened our awareness of the grave injustice of racism, which is grievous to God. Drawing on initiatives from several organisations, we are invited to join in remembrance and prayer on Tuesday 25th May 2021, the first anniversary of his death.

Sankofa Collective reminds us that in the Old Testament the same Hebrew word ברך is used for bending the knee and blessing: “to bless, kneel, salute, or greet”. We take to our knees to bless the Lord, who is worthy of praise, glory, and adoration. In the New Testament, the Greek word κάμψει / κάμπτω used in Romans 14:11, Ephesians 3:14 and Philippians 2:10 means ‘to bend’, ‘bend’ being the more accurate translation than ‘bow’. The Weymouth New Testament translation of Ephesians 3:14-15 reads: “On bended knee, I beseech the Father, from whom the whole family in Heaven and on earth derives its name.

Churches Together in England invites us to ‘Light the Candle for Justice’ at noon, committing ourselves to action, and to join:  Doing Justice: A National Service of Reflection on the Anniversary of the murder of George Floyd at 7pm on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ctbimedia

The Crush Racism Challenge invites us to Take the Knee in Prayer for 9 minutes 29 seconds at 8.30pm, the duration George Floyd endured from the knee of injustice and the time of his death.

Taking to our knees in humble prayer for repentance, to cry for mercy, and to seek conciliation is a prayer for justice, while taking the knee in militant action may keep people in a standoff rather than facilitating conciliation. So, we invite you on Tuesday 25th May to:

TAKE THE KNEE & PRAY

Bending the knee to worship

Bending the knee to lament

Bending the knee to bless

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